Why buying high-priced quality clothing is profitable

Why Quality Clothing Makes Cents

Any consumer knows you’ll pay more for quality clothing. But unlike cheaper items, a timeless garment won’t fall apart or fall out of fashion. So, while you may pay more upfront, a higher-priced ensemble can wind up costing you less in the long run.

Misleading Words

Sure, there are many low-cost clothes available. Typically these items are referred to as “value-priced” which isn’t necessarily accurate since the word “value” actually refers to quality. Bargain basement stores use the word value to make consumers believe they are buying clothes of quality when, in reality, they’re cheaply-made. 

Disposable Clothes

The problem with cheaply-made clothes is that they often shrink after one washing or rip at the seams after they are worn a couple times. It may sound like a deal to get a top for only $7 but if that top falls apart shortly after you buy it, then it’s more like a steal since you paid for a disposable garment. Practically speaking, it’s wiser to apply those $7 towards a higher-priced garment that will last longer.

Size Matters

Sometimes you can find a brand name garment on sale. Ordinarily this type of high-quality piece would cost a lot but since it’s marked down, you’re getting a bargain. That’s great. If it fits. But many times the pieces marked down are the ones that didn’t sell because they are an odd size. Buying a nice item that doesn’t fit well is a mistake many people make because they are looking more at the price tag than the size on the label.

Lasting Fashion

In general, fad pieces usually cost less because they are designed to quickly go out of fashion. Although they may not fall apart like cheaply-made items, they won’t last long since they will appear dated after one season. That’s why it’s better to invest in a classic piece. Although it will cost more at the initial purchase, the timelessness of its style will get you through several seasons of wear.

If you’re looking for timeless Muslim clothing that is durable and fits well, Artizara manufactures its own designs to maintain quality control so your Islamic clothing will keep you looking good for years to come.

Enjoy Islamic and Arabic artwork on display in Illinois museum

Enjoy Islamic Art in the Museum—and at Home

This winter, the Islamic world can be seen indoors in art. For the first time in many years, the Art Institute of Chicago has allocated a specific gallery to showcase the artistic culture of Islam.

Arranged in chronological order, the installation extends geographically from Spain and northern Africa to India and Central Asia with objects dating back from the medieval age to the great empires of Ottoman Turkey, Safavid Iran, and Mughal India.

Located in the museum’s gallery 50, the installation highlights architectural pieces such as wooden doors and beams from Morocco and tile spandrels from Iran. Islamic ornamentation, paintings, calligraphy, textiles and carpets are also on display, however these pieces will be rotated since some are on loan from both public and private collections.

From 10:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., the Art Institute offers free winter weekdays through February 10, 2015 to Illinois residents. The museum also provides an ongoing free admission offer to Illinois residents every Thursday evening, from 5:00 to 8:00 p.m. For more information on the Islamic art display, visit http://www.artic.edu/exhibition/new-galleries-islamic-art.

Once you view the museum’s display, you’ll want to bring the Islamic aesthetic into your home with artwork of your very own. Artizara carries an affordable line of original Arabic and Islamic art and photographic prints. To peruse the collection, check out http://www.artizara.com/islamic-art-islamic-photos-arabic-art.

Muslim clothing ideas for winter

Stay warm—and fashionable—in sweaters

“Sweaters are a closet staple,” says Colombian fashion journalist and critic Nina García. Having served as the fashion director for such magazines as Elle and Marie Claire, there’s no doubt she knows what she’s talking about.

“Knitwear can play a vital part in layering,” echoes British supermodel Twiggy. “The simplicity of a lightweight cardigan makes it one of the best ways to layer outfits,” explains the fashion icon. “I love grandad cardis for winter, worn over a vintage lace shirt, waistcoat and full skirt with slouchy boots.”

“I think there’s something charming about incorporating summer clothes into winter, like pairing a summery skirt with a massive sweater,” suggests American entertainer Debby Ryan. “I’m also really into layering during the winter.”

“When I’m at home or at school, I’m casual and comfortable,” notes American model AnnaSophia Robb. “I tend to wear work out clothes and lots of sweaters.”

No matter how you wear them, sweaters are an essential part of every winter wardrobe, from sweater jackets to cocoon sweaters. A Thalia lightweight duster cardigan is ideal for layering as is an Alexa hooded cardigan that covers your head.

Now that the weather is getting colder, you can remain warm and fashionable in a Lana Aztec long sweater cardigan. Available in soft knit, the ankle length style features a draped front, which adds a chic accent to any ensemble.

For an added touch of pizzaz, try a Kamil embroidered kimono cardigan or a Marwa crochet trim shawl cardigan jacket with crochet ruffle.

All of these winter staples are available at Artizara where you can find a wide array of modesty garments to keep you looking good and feeling cozy throughout the cold season.

 

Thea Porter designs & fashion - Transporting time and geography!

Thea Porter Designs Transport Time and Geography

What did The Beatles, The Rolling Stones and Pink Floyd have in common with Elizabeth Taylor, Lauren Bacall and Princess Margaret? The Middle Eastern-inspired fashions of Thea Porter which will be on display at London’s Fashion and Textile Museum from February 6 to May 3, 2015.

Entitled, “Thea Porter: 70s Bohemian Chic,” the exhibition features more than 150 pieces reflecting Porter’s career which she began as an interior decorator before graduating into a fashion designing icon of the 1960s and 70s.

Renown for her use of exotic clothing such as brocade caftans and the Chazara jacket, Porter was inspired by her childhood travels to the Middle East where she formed an appreciation for patterned silks and other fine fabrics. With her uniquely universal aesthetic, Porter popularized Indian handprints and Islamic textiles such as the suzani embroideries and the ikats of Central Asia as well as Ottoman velvets and the embroidered material of Damascus.

“Thea Porter’s ambition was to create clothes that were intrinsically beautiful, and that would last,” states the Laura McLaws Helms, guest curator of the exhibition. “Today, they are appreciated by not only the customers who have treasured them, but also by a new generation of devotees who continue to seek out her designs: Kate Moss, Julia Roberts, Nicole Richie, Ashley and Mary-Kate Olsen – the appeal of a unique and original Thea Porter dress endures today among some of the most fashionable women in the public eye.”

From Islamic tunic tops and loose pants to long skirts and Hijab wraps, Artizara offers a number of mix-and-match pieces which can help current fashionistas achieve a Bohemian Chic similar to the styles Thea Porter made famous.

Techniques of wearing a Hijab

3 Ways to Make a Hijab Your Own

A key part of Muslim clothing for women is the hijab. However, the way in which one wears it can be totally unique depending on your choice of fabric (cotton, silk or wool) as well as the complexity of the scarf style (as noted below).

Beginner

The simplest style is a one-piece al-amira scarf which can easily be slipped over the head. To ensure a modest approach, there is a two-piece al-amira scarf which includes an underscarf for additional head coverage. Similar to a headband this extra piece slides onto your head first and then is surrounded by the full scarf. As you arrange the folds of the scarf to secure it in place, make sure the fabric drapes over your front, back and shoulders.

Intermediate

If you prefer a side-pinned style, start with a large rectangular scarf or pashmina and one scarf pin. Place the fabric over your head with the edge of the scarf passing over the top of your forehead. The sides of the scarf should be draped over your shoulders with one side hanging twice as low as the other. Next, swing the long end of the scarf around your chin and over your head. Then, drape the end of the scarf over your other shoulder. To make sure the scarf stays in place, take your scarf pin and secure the fabric near the side of your head. If done correctly, the scarf should appear as one loop that goes around your head and under your chin.

Advanced

While a triangle style looks basic, it does require a measure of precision to perfect—as well as two pins and a square-shaped scarf. First, fold the top right corner to the bottom left corner of the scarf so it creates a triangle shape. Then, put the widest part of the triangle at the top of your forehead and drape the two corners over your shoulders so the third corner of the triangle is at the back of your head. The next step takes some coordination since you must pinch the edges of the scarf that are under your chin—while opening your jaw as wide as possible, and using one of the two pins to secure the scarf under your chin. Once that’s done, you can close your mouth. Now, cross the corners of the scarf over your neck so the left side is to the right, and vice versa. Next, drape the tails of the scarf over your shoulders so you can use the other pin to attach the scarf tails behind your head. Finally, lift the back corner of the scarf and pin the ends at the back of your head, then drape the corner of the scarf up so it covers the pinned part. If folded and pinned properly, the scarf should be straight and remain securely in place.

That’s the technical part. The creative portion comes into play when you select the color and fabric from a hijab store such as Artizara.